Monthly Archives: March 2012

Grid paper rules!

If I had only one material with which to teach mathematics from Kindergarten to grade 6, it would be grid paper with 1cm squares. Over the years, I have used grid paper to teach counting, skip counting, multiplication, and area … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 1 Comment

One material, many ways to learn

Within the Montessori classroom, there are endless ways to work with the materials. Some of these ways are set out in the curriculum taught in the teacher training program, whereas others are improvised to match an interest on the part … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Show, but don’t tell

A twist on the “show and tell” idea, Montessori favours “show, but don’t tell.” For children under 6, her method involves demonstrating an activity, but not giving verbal instructions. Discussion is certainly part of teaching, but not direct instruction. Why … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Breaking the rules

The loudest, and in my view the most justified, criticism of Montessori programs is that they are rigid – the teacher shows “the right way” to do the work – and the children must conform. Thankfully, most Montessori schools don’t … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Concentration

How do children learn to concentrate? To answer this, think of when you have seen a young child completely absorbed in an activity. It might be pouring water back and forth from one container to another or building a sandcastle.  … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

True or False?

Children have a wonderful sense of humour, especially at the ages of 4 and 5. Since they are so tuned into the language around them (they are picking up grammar, vocabulary, and complex sentence structure at an impressive pace), they … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment